Fiber

Soluble-Fiber and Insoluble-Fiber Foods

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends adult women consume 25 grams of total fiber per day and adult men consume 38 grams, with 10 to 15 grams coming from soluble fiber. As you age, you need less and over age 50, women should consume 21 grams and men should consume 30 grams.

Soluble fiber is fiber that is easily dissolved in water, where it forms a gel-like substance. This type of fiber has been shown to help lower blood cholesterol levels as well as blood glucose levels.

Soluble fiber is found in:

Apples
Barley
Beans
Carrots
Citrus fruits
Corn
Flour
Hazelnuts
Jicama
Mixed vegetables (frozen)
Oats
Okra, cooked
Onion (white, yellow, red, cooked)
Parsnips
Pears
Prunes
Peas, cooked
Soy flour*
Yams (canned with syrup, drained)
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Hazelnuts

Insoluble Fiber: Insoluble fiber is a fiber that helps speed up elimination from the body. Insoluble fiber can help prevent constipation. Insoluble fiber also helps keep the pH level in your intestinal tract at an optimum level. The foods that are highest in insoluble fiber include the following:

Almonds*
Apple with skin
Baking chocolate
Barley, cooked
Bran cereal
Blueberries
Brazil nuts
Broccoli*
Brussels sprouts*
Bulgur
Cabbage*
Carrots
Cauliflower*
Cereal party mix, homemade
Cherries
Chestnuts
Coconut
Corn nuts
Corn
Cranberries
Elderberries
Figs
Flax seed
Flour, barley, barley bran, barley malt, rye, whole wheat
Gooseberries
Green beans
Guava
Hickory nuts
Hominy
Jicama
Kale*
Kidney beans
Kiwi
Kumquat
Lentils
Macadamia nuts
Mandarin oranges
Mango
Millet*
Mushrooms
Nectarine
Oatmeal
Oyster
Papaya
Pasta, cooked
Peanuts*
Pears
Peas
Pine nuts
Pineapple
Pistachios
Potatoes
Prunes
Pumpkin seeds
Pumpkin puree
Quinoa
Raisins
Raspberries
Rhubarb
Rice (brown, cooked)
Rutabaga
Sauerkraut
Sorghum
Spinach
Split peas
Sprouts
Squash
Strawberries
Sunflower seeds
Sweet potato
Tomato paste
Tomatoes
Trail mix
Turnips
Vegetable juice
Walnuts
Wheat bran germ
Whole wheat flour
Wild rice (cooked)
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Fresh Raspberries

* Note that these high-fiber foods are also goitrogenic, meaning that they promote thyroid enlargement and can potentially cause or aggravate hypothyroidism. Typically, the risk of goitrogenic foods is in overconsuming them, especially in raw form. Cooking or steaming typically eliminates most goitrogenic properties.